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Thread: Examination and courses

  1. #1
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    Examination and courses

    Hi to all,
    After a couple of months of reading and doing the exercises in the Autodesk Revit Architecture 2014 Essentials book I had been given, I have now just finished reading it. I feel ready to do a course, but a lot of the 3-day training centres in my area (I live in Birmingham UK) are very expensive, they range from about ú800 to ú1000! are there any cheaper ones around? could I do some freelance work to save the money?

    I also want to know if there are any practice websites for the exam? I found one for the Revit Architecture 2011 version, I got about 60% right on the second time I did the test.

    I am planning to start reading and doing the exercises for Revit 2014 MEP, but I would like to pass the essentials exam first, so I can get qualified and can start to look for work if I can.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated,

    Regards,
    Nightcast200
    Last edited by nightcast200; May 13th, 2014 at 11:39 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightcast200 View Post
    so I can get qualified and can start to look for work if I can.
    Qualified in what may I ask?

    You are aware that the Autodesk Certifications aren't real qualifications and are far from a prerequisite for getting Revit-based work?

    As for training courses, there are far better things to spend money on. Like a nice outfit for interviews. Seriously.

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    Member Cyus's Avatar
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    I'd personally value practice of having used the program over exam based qualifications. If you've never had any job experience with Revit, you can demonstrate your knowledge of it with a portfolio or via discussions at an interview. Saying that you're skilled in Revit on your CV would be enough to get you an interview (as long as everything else is what we'd want), and you can prove yourself from there.

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    Hi there snowyweston and Cyus,
    Thank you for the advice.
    Qualified in what may I ask?]
    With Revit, I want to specialize in Architecture and MEP, I wouldn't mind doing some dimensioning and scheduling at first. I have drawn a rough 3D model of a building my brother was thinking of buying. He gave me a rough sketch with some dimensions and started from there.
    I'll be starting to study the MEP in the next day or two and see how I can get on from there. I had thought a lot of companies would want qualifications and experience, hence why I asked about qualifications. I don't have any building, design or engineering qualifications to speak of.. I am 47 next week, and I was hoping there was somewhere where I can demonstrate my skills. I know I haven't used the program for that long, but with learning the MEP side, I'm sure I'll get some more experience.

    Regards,
    Nightcast200

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    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    The "only" limiting factor I potentially foresee you coming up against is
    a lack of any building, design or engineering qualifications
    - because that'll put you slightly behind other candidates for posts where that counts over Revit skills.

    Stating the obvious really, but it's worth understanding many BIM Managers prefer to teach their methods to people - and there's quite a bit of "unlearning" with new starters who've come pre-equipped with "best practice" and ideas of how to do things (regardless of whether that was self-taught or from previous practice)

    That said, the engineering side of the professions, at least here in the UK, are still quite fond of the "brains + brawn" workshare of consultants-in-suits-at-meetings backed up by an army of (relatively unskilled) technicians-in-the-basement. It's a sweeping generalisation that I'm not qualified or able to support - but the prevalence of tell-tale signs of backroom mismanagement and outsourcing is often very apparent when squirreling around models produced by some larger practices.

    You're clearly quite keen, so perhaps there are other opportunities for Revit-related work that you've not yet considered? The first that comes to mind, Construction. More and more contractors are enabling/building their teams with Revit/other-"BIM"-tool expertise - there's possibly an "in" somewhere there.

    Second, content creation. It's not exactly glamorous - but the demand is definitely there - and if you're any good at making stuff (and sticking to their compliance checklists) then perhaps someone like BIMStore or NBL would be worth getting in contact with?

    Third, the London MET were looking for a BIM Manager recently! In fact a number of big (UK) public body organisations are making their weight felt in the BIM-vacancy arena - and will not (necessarily) require professional accreditations; for instance TFL, London Underground, NHS, MOJ, etc... they're all getting into it - perhaps that's something that might appeal?

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    Hi snowyweston,
    I want to thank you greatly for the advice in the job opportunities that you have presented to me. I am just starting to study the MEP book that I had been given, I am certainly hoping it will only take me a couple of months to study it,(although the MEP book is twice as thick as the Revit Architecture Essentials one). I will certainly look into construction, that does sound like something I'm interesting in, if it's "constructing elements, etc"
    I will have a look at BIMStore and NBL and certainly if any of the companies you have mentioned could have something to start with.

    Ideally, I would like to work from home as freelance, if that would be possible.

    Regards,
    Nightcast200

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    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightcast200 View Post
    Ideally, I would like to work from home as freelance, if that would be possible.
    Wouldn't we all!?! For that work-model, I'd definitely recommend you consider the content-creation route, which means focusing in on the family editor side of things (both books/disciplines) and getting up to speed with what's considered "best practice" for such - so that you can make a couple of files to send through along with your CV.

    I can't say it's a full-time income job, I guess that depends on how prolific you become - but certainly there are a few people out there making good business out of it with their own ventures:
    Andekan ╗ Blog
    Revit Components

    with some going so far as to write books on the topic (which might interest you?) :
    New eBook Release: Creating Custom Revit Architecture 2012 Families | ClubRevit


    ...but that's going it alone, often off the back of experience providing that kind of service for CAD and/or from working directly "in" the game. Were I you, I'd probably focus on an "employed" position.

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    Senior Member rkitect's Avatar
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    Here are some quick statistics for you preceded by a background story:

    In 2005 I got a job based on my desire to learn and ability to use cad. This is where I starting using Revit on a professional level. In 2007 I got a job based on my proficiency in Revit. In 2008 I got a job based on my proficiency in Revit. In 2009 I lost that job based on poor economy in the hospitality sector. In 2009 I got my revit certification. In 2009 I was passed over on 3 Revit based jobs even when I had my revit certification. In 2011 I got a new job because of my demonstration of my Revit proficiency. I never once mentioned I was certified.

    Statistics:

    Number of Revit Certifications: 3
    Percentage of jobs received due to proficiency, professionalism and eagerness: 100%
    Percentage of Jobs I've gotten because of those certifications: 0%

    I can't even pretend that these certifications have done anything to help me in my career except demonstrate that I'm smarter than the people who translate the certification exams from whichever language they are originated in to English.

    Best of luck to you!
    Last edited by rkitect; May 14th, 2014 at 07:58 PM.

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    Senior Member rkitect's Avatar
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    I also want to point out that modeling in Revit is not the same as the traditional drafting job in CAD or on paper. You need to have more than a proficiency in modeling and Revit. You need to have a proficiency in building systems and how they work. If you don't understand wood construction because you are from a place where you only build with Concrete, then you're not going to be able to model a wood construction building properly in Revit regardless of any certifications you may have from Autodesk. The best thing you can do for yourself if this is the industry you want to be involved with is to go look at some books like Architecture Graphic Standards or Building Construction Illustrated and learn how buildings go together. The people that are going to be hired are the ones who can demonstrate their ability to translate THAT knowledge into the software.

    That's just my $.02

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    Hi snowyweston and rkitect,
    I want to thank you both for the great advice that you have given me. I have looked at the Andekan blog and he has done a lot of families, unfortunately, I have noticed this on a lot of revit-orientated websites, there seems to be *lots* of family downloads available. So I'm not sure if I could add or enhance on what is already available out there..

    You are right rkitect, in that learning the development process of making a building would be a great help, but I am still planning to learn the MEP side of things.
    Even though I haven't got any qualifications in engineering, I have come from a engineering (metal, machine, and benchwork) background, I have worked in a sheet-metal factory for some months my years ago. So I know a fair amount of the ducting and fans involved, I know a little about domestic plumbing, I guess the electrical side of MEP I don't know a lot about. I have been told that there are a lot of engineers that need a sketch to be "revited".

    Regards,
    Nightcast200

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