Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Not an Architect

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    July 26, 2018
    Posts
    5
    Current Local Time
    07:08 PM

    Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Not an Architect

    Hi,

    I am not an architect, but am becoming quite accomplished in Architectural modeling. Are there jobs in the field for someone without a degree in Architecture, but who is an accomplished modeler?

    Many thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator Robin Deurloo's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 7, 2011
    Location
    Rotterdam, Holland
    Posts
    1,635
    Current Local Time
    05:08 AM

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I moved your post to a different section of the forum, because the Career Corner only has posts you can not reply too and you are asking a question, so that's not the best spot for that.

    And to answer (part) of your question. I'm not an architect either and been doing this job for over 20 years now (self-employed for the past 3 years or so). I do however have an education in construction. Looked up my education compared to what you would call it in the USA and that would be an associate’s degree. But in most cases these days people that do what I do have a bachelor’s degree, but I make up that difference (and then some) in experience. So, just knowing Revit will not cut it I guess, you need to know how a building is put together at least a bit. Extending that knowledge can be done on the job, but you need a boss willing to help you with that.

  3. #3
    Mr. Revit OpEd
    Join Date
    December 14, 2010
    Posts
    3,188
    Current Local Time
    08:08 PM

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Yes you can. It will be a steeper hill to climb because you'll be competing with people who do have the credentials you don't. Having a positive persistent attitude is essential to help you though that phase. Experience and relationships matter too. Find local (AIA, Revit User, Computer User, Construction) and internet groups to participate in that can put you in a position to meet people who work at firms. They don't know you're looking for a job unless you tell them and being able to do that means getting to know people. Much in life is built on who you know, who gets to know you. Generally people like to help other people (like here in this forum), especially people they know, like and trust. Persistence matters. If you want to do this work, do some research too. Where do you want to work? What kind of architecture? There is much variety. Size of the firm? Want construction experience or prefer design? Earning the credibility to really get to do design is a very steep hill. Getting an interview is one hill to climb...actually surviving it is another...all before you get to do the work. Work hard up front so you get the job before the interview...


    I'll add, when firms are busy (like now) it's good time to go for it. Firms need people to get billable work done. If you can promise results then they are much more likely to give you a shot now as compared with when there are 200 other people with more credentials vying for the same job. This business is cyclical too; like home building/design is quite vulnerable to shorter economic cycles while others are less so (healthcare has been pretty consistent for a longer cycle). Finding a firm that intentional pursues work to be less vulnerable to cycles is a good plan. Then once you get a shot you'll have to work very hard to build respect in the firm so you have a good chance of surviving the next slow cycle.
    Last edited by Steve_Stafford; November 24th, 2019 at 09:30 PM.

  4. #4
    Lurker
    Join Date
    January 20, 2020
    Posts
    0
    Current Local Time
    03:08 AM

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    [To become an architect ,there is need of creative mind with full of new ideas for interior as well as for home designs. there should also have proper knowledge of material use. so one should get training in it then he or she can become good architect

  5. #5
    Senior Member DavidLarson's Avatar
    Join Date
    July 10, 2015
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    784
    Current Local Time
    09:08 PM

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I have an AA from a now defunt trade school. Since then I've been a BIM manager, a professor, full time architectural modeler and now do MEP design in the modular industry.

    Degrees mean nothing unless you're talking Freemasonry or candy making.

  6. #6
    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 21, 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,830
    Current Local Time
    08:08 PM

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Check out some of the scan to BIM companies out there. Decent place to start.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    July 26, 2019
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Posts
    67
    Current Local Time
    10:08 PM

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Depends, a great deal, on location. Outside the US there are a number of places where talented content creators are frequently used, even assembled into teams to work on various projects.

    In the US, many (larger) Engineering firms do this as well. If with a distinct "pecking order" (Principal -> PE -> -> EIT -> Drafter). And, sadly pay and advancement can be limited at the bottom tier.

    In the US there is a huge variety within the larger construction industry. There are a number of jobs out there that simply have to be filled, and one's ability to create content often over-rules their formal qualifications. But, you probably need access to very large (over 50-75 employee) firms in larger cities to be able to tap into that. Mostly. Sort of. Your Mileage May Vary.

    Becoming a Licensed Architect in the US is a long, arduous (and expensive) process. It takes (on average; each State is slightly different) 5-6 years of university study with a degree. Then 2-3 years of working as an "intern" (paid, if only just barely) while studying up on how to pass the required State exams*.

    The numbers are some what fascinating. The US has about 1.2 million lawyers/attorneys before the Bar. There are right at 900,000 Doctors in the US. But, there are only about 100,000 Licensed Architects.

    Small architecture firms (<25) will want to hire people they can bill more for, so, they tend to have a focus on people with licenses, and use Interns for the grunt labor. It's the nature of the beast.

    Basically, keep improving your skills, network in your area with people using those skills, often a "fit" will just occur.

    ___________________________________________
    *Currently in Texas there are 10 separate exams which you can take at a number of locations. 40 years ago, everyone taking the exam piled up on the TCU campus where they all took all ten tests over a span of 5 days, with Wednesday being the 12 hour Design & Draw Problem, using pencils, pens and a portable drafting board & instruments.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 34
    Last Post: January 16th, 2015, 08:59 PM
  2. I'm an Architect
    By dzatto in forum Out There
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 28th, 2013, 10:34 PM
  3. Architect / Intern Architect - Louisville, KY
    By cellophane in forum Career Corner
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 4th, 2012, 06:04 PM
  4. Architect/ Intern Architect
    By cellophane in forum Career Corner
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 10th, 2012, 03:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •