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Thread: Single line diagrams to 3D Diagrams

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    Single line diagrams to 3D Diagrams

    Has anyone started utilizing 3D diagrams in Revit instead of one-lines? The company I work for is looking into making all Revit projects from Revit. Are there any cons to this? IMO, the hardest part would be during SD sets, especially for the plumbing side. They typically don't model in locations for risers, they normally just place equipment in the model and we link in their riser diagrams from CAD on a drafting view, then place it on a sheet. I don't think it would be hard to locate and model in pipe risers and some branches.

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    without creating more work for yourself the short answer is no

    A lot of it depends on the building though and how it is arranged if its a very repetitive symmetrical building you may be able to get something working

    "real world" layout compared to graphical representation (which is the entire purpose of riser diagrams/schematics) will be tough

    Myself, i currently keep them separate and leave my schematics/risers in autocad. This allows basically anyone in the office (since they all no CAD) to modify the diagrams and we hold off a long as possible to actually model it (make sure it works)...this has become the unfortunate reality with working in parallel with arch design more and more to help reduce our re work

    EDIT: I will mention one thing i have done in the past is create some generic models to represent different groupings of fixtures, drawing fixtures to match how i want them to show in elevation and then cut a elevation for my riser....in the end i can tell you it was not worth the effort since i lost all association with the actual fixtures themselves by faking in my box anyways...that is just one approach i have attempted to try and accommodate the "traditional" style people are accustomed to seeing for risers
    Last edited by wgfletch; January 2nd, 2020 at 03:51 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wgfletch View Post
    without creating more work for yourself the short answer is no

    A lot of it depends on the building though and how it is arranged if its a very repetitive symmetrical building you may be able to get something working

    "real world" layout compared to graphical representation (which is the entire purpose of riser diagrams/schematics) will be tough

    Myself, i currently keep them separate and leave my schematics/risers in autocad. This allows basically anyone in the office (since they all no CAD) to modify the diagrams and we hold off a long as possible to actually model it (make sure it works)...this has become the unfortunate reality with working in parallel with arch design more and more to help reduce our re work

    EDIT: I will mention one thing i have done in the past is create some generic models to represent different groupings of fixtures, drawing fixtures to match how i want them to show in elevation and then cut a elevation for my riser....in the end i can tell you it was not worth the effort since i lost all association with the actual fixtures themselves by faking in my box anyways...that is just one approach i have attempted to try and accommodate the "traditional" style people are accustomed to seeing for risers
    We currently do them in autocad as well, but trying to move away from that. I've read articles on using the model itself in Revit to move away from single-line since we are now modeling and not drafting anymore. There are a few companies that have taken modeling a step further and have used Revit to do their details and such. But it was project specific. Some say they are trying to submit their models instead of submitting documents to make their models more lean. But these companies are in a different company.

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    Revit has 2D drafting views that can be utilized for diagrams and details. It is different from AutoCAD and nowhere near as robust but the drafting tools do have some cool features. Diehard AutoCAD users will resist the transition and continue using AutoCAD until it is taken away.

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    No doubt that AutoCAD is a more powerful 2D draughting software but there is a lot of value in having all the information for one job in one file.
    Not to mention the ease of PDF Creation with revisions from that central file. (Less errors generally that mixed files)

    Longest part you will find is creating annotation symbols for the equipment you are used to having blocks for in autoCAD i think for the schematics
    ion
    for the risers, grasp the use of line styles and system type filters. its going to make your life a lot easier drawing a pipe up a rise and cutting a section through it instead of doing it the old way, plus your construct documents look awesome with 3d riser views ect....(Aaaaand your model can then be effectively used in the model co-ordination process)

    win win win win...if you can get the learning curve from AutoCAD out of the way

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    I've done this on a number of projects. It helps to make your single-line 3D view at a very large scale so that the linework is legible. But it is tricky, and you'll be massaging the views up until the day it goes out, but it's doable.

    I've also set up a series of Detail Items that mimic our standard riser diagram blocks, so we can create them "the old fashioned way" in Drafting Views. I've been trying to get us off of AutoCAD entirely because there's always some annoying graphical issue when you import CAD into Revit.

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    We always model DWV and supply systems and use 3D views for riser diagrams. In larger projects, we use section boxes to isolate risers for legibility, and may have a full building below slab isometric to show the relationship between risers. We also will make sections of pipe and fittings transparent if they obscure objects behind them. Before tagging, you must determine the best rotation of the view for readability. If more clarity is needed for specific areas, we show a section detail.

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