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Thread: Traditional drawing rendering in Revit

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Traditional drawing rendering in Revit

    I was just plotting a drawing as existing to PDF when it struck me that while most people know about the 3D and 'BIM' credentials of Revit, hardly anyone seems to realise that you can do really nice traditional-style drawing rendering with little effort in Revit. Not just for the sake of it. Heritage jobs in particular the authorities like a soft pencil and watercolour look to drawings

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    Moderator Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    Very nice !

    With my age of 40 I might be one of the old school guys already, but I always try to make my drawings look pretty, the way I was used to in AutoCAD, so shadows, lineweights a tree here and there, basically just what you did there. So not just all about the data.

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Yes, thanks, I agree, I think it matters still

    Depth cueing in elevations is so good for planning applications

    By the way, I have just noticed that I did not place a scale on the drawing - must add that
    Last edited by willsud; April 24th, 2020 at 03:39 PM.

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    Autodesk Scott D Davis's Avatar
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    would you please share some steps for your technique? Looks great!

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Thanks Scott.

    Happy to describe how I do this sort of thing.

    They are very simple tweaks. Most of it is choice of suitable pale colours for materials and surface patterns

    I work in a Fine View with Consistent Colors. Anti-aliasing is turned off (probably the default?) which helps soften the look. You could further soften the edges by editing the defaults for Wall and Roof lines in Object Styles from Black to say Dark Grey but I don't bother since at the end of the day this is still meant to be a drawing

    I find that Override Graphic Display Element is much more sensitive than the 'OGD All' tool and foreground objects with 20% transparency (typically bushes and trees) look nice slightly see-through.
    Thin lines I might add in a View to make things look right (the horizontal joints in the quoin stones in that elevation for example) I usually select these and make them Half-tone using the same dialog.

    Plotting settings also help (the image I posted originally was a screenshot of a pdf plot).

    In Adobe PDF plot settings I choose 'Smallest File Size' for Output and in Revit Print Settings I choose Raster processing and Raster quality: High , Colour. ('Presentation quality' is available in Raster quality but loses something in looks for me.)

    I've attached an image with some notes and screenshots which I hope is legible but if anyone has any queries (or suggestions) please post.

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    If it's of interest here is an example where I've used depth cueing.

    Left image without and right image with - settings screenshot in the middle.

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    Administrator Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willsud View Post
    Thanks Scott.

    Happy to describe how I do this sort of thing.

    They are very simple tweaks. Most of it is choice of suitable pale colours for materials and surface patterns

    I work in a Fine View with Consistent Colors. Anti-aliasing is turned off (probably the default?) which helps soften the look. You could further soften the edges by editing the defaults for Wall and Roof lines in Object Styles from Black to say Dark Grey but I don't bother since at the end of the day this is still meant to be a drawing

    I find that Override Graphic Display Element is much more sensitive than the 'OGD All' tool and foreground objects with 20% transparency (typically bushes and trees) look nice slightly see-through.
    Thin lines I might add in a View to make things look right (the horizontal joints in the quoin stones in that elevation for example) I usually select these and make them Half-tone using the same dialog.

    Plotting settings also help (the image I posted originally was a screenshot of a pdf plot).

    In Adobe PDF plot settings I choose 'Smallest File Size' for Output and in Revit Print Settings I choose Raster processing and Raster quality: High , Colour. ('Presentation quality' is available in Raster quality but loses something in looks for me.)

    I've attached an image with some notes and screenshots which I hope is legible but if anyone has any queries (or suggestions) please post.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Revit-elevation-tweaks.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	717.1 KB 
ID:	38752
    Great post, and killer settings! I find the big heavy hitting items in these settings are:

    1. Color OTHER than black, for the surface patterns of objects. Ill use a light gray a lot of the time, but it REALLY softens up drawings where Revit is super brutish, with patterns OOTB.
    2. Lighting / Shadow settings. People typically keep these WAY too high. Your settings look great. When i do 3d axons, i have them a bit brighter, but i want those views to show more contrast. So i start with 60/40/20, to your 27/15/17.
    3. Consistent Colors. Its SO overlooked. I dont use it much in 3D, but in Elevations, its clutch.

    Thanks for posting that image, its great to see your actual settings. That model (and images) looks fantastic!

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Thanks Aaron, and for your settings info.

    Really interesting to know as it's never occurred to me to try higher settings for Lighting / Shadow settings - must give it a go

    cheers,

    Will

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    Member Geert's Avatar
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    Looks great Will.
    May I ask you how you model your cornerstones? I tend to do them as face or wall based objects that cot the wall but that can be quite elaborate and doesnt always play nice with joined walls.

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    Forum Addict willsud's Avatar
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    Thanks Geert. That is a very good question

    I do not always model the quoin stones because in our local style of building with coursed slate rubble the quoins are in the same plane as the rest of the wall and if small they blend in visually (please see image of part of this property below). This particular job, although tiny, is for an expert on heritage buildings who is very particular about detailing and so I thought it worth showing the quoin stones. It also helps the look of the Elevations.

    The quoins are irregular in most of our local buildings of this style (curiously the older the building often the larger the quoin stones) and so every quoin needs to be modelled. I have used face-based families in the past but here I opted to just use Split Face, thinking it would be quicker (it wasn't). A down side of that approach I discovered is the line around the Split Face region is the same thickness and colour as Wall lines in general and thus too prominent in the elevations - but you live and learn

    The proposals (a small extension on pillars) are going to be interesting on this job - the client knows a lot about classical architecture. I have Paul Aubin's 'Renaissance Revit' book to hand just in case

    Last edited by willsud; April 26th, 2020 at 08:25 AM. Reason: Added image

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